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Fri, Apr 18, 2014

ARCHIVED AIRCRAFT & AIRPORT TECHNOLOGY

University of Alabama researcher develops a 'sponge' material that cuts jet engine noise | University of Alabama
University of Alabama researcher develops a 'sponge' material that cuts jet engine noise
Fri 10 May 2012 - A breakthrough technology to reduce aircraft engine noise at source has been developed and patented by an engineering professor from the University of Alabama. So far, noise reduction has been addressed after the fact - suppressing the noise outside the engine after the combustion process takes place. Dr Ajay Agrawal has come up with a sponge-like material that eliminates the noise at source, during the combustion process. The challenge of cutting the sound level during the process is that combustion happens at extremely high temperatures and pressure. Most materials cannot withstand such conditions but Agrawal says he and his team have found a suitable porous material.  Read more ...

Boeing promises additional fuel burn improvement from new winglets for 737 MAX as Airbus unveils Sharklets | Winglets,Sharklets,737 MAX,A320neo
Boeing promises additional fuel burn improvement from new winglets for 737 MAX as Airbus unveils Sharklets
Thu 10 May 2012 - A new Advanced Technology winglet design concept for the 737 MAX will provide airline customers for the re-engined aircraft that is due to come into service in 2017 with up to an additional 1.5 per cent improvement, depending on range, says Boeing. This is on top of the 10-12 per cent improvement promised by the new-engine variant. Compared to current Boeing wingtip technology, which provides up to a 4 per cent fuel-burn saving at long ranges, the new winglet will see a total fuel-burn improvement of up to 5.5 per cent on the same long routes, claims the airplane manufacturer. Meanwhile, Airbus has rolled-out the first new Airbus A320 to be fitted with Sharklet wingtip devices which are expected to reduce fuel burn by up to 3.5 per cent. Read more ...

Alitalia becomes launch customer for WheelTug's innovative aircraft taxiing electric drive system | WheelTug,Alitalia,Jet Airways,Israir,Prague Airport
Alitalia becomes launch customer for WheelTug's innovative aircraft taxiing electric drive system
Wed 9 May 2012 - WheelTug has signed a partnership agreement with Alitalia to install 100 of its innovative electric drive systems on 100 of the Italian airline's A320 aircraft and so become the launch customer for the patented system. The equipment allows aircraft to taxi both forwards without the use of main engines and backwards without the use of a tow tug. The new technology allows up to an 80 per cent reduction in the fuel consumption for aircraft ground movements, with a significant reduction in cost, noise and environmental impact, claims WheelTug. In March, the company signed Letters of Intent with Israir Airlines for 10 systems for its A320 fleet, subject to financial and operational feasibility checks and regulatory approvals, and also with Jet Airways, giving the Indian airline the right to lease systems for installation on its Boeing 737NG aircraft.  Read more ...

UK’s Monarch Airlines signs up to Pratt & Whitney’s EcoFlight to develop and implement fuel efficiencies | Pratt & Whitney,EcoFlight Solutions,Monarch Airlines,Flight Sciences International, Aviaso,LOT Polish Airlines
UK’s Monarch Airlines signs up to Pratt & Whitney’s EcoFlight to develop and implement fuel efficiencies
Wed 9 May 2012 - Leisure carrier Monarch Airlines has signed a five-year commitment with Pratt & Whitney for the engine manufacturer's EcoFlight Solutions fuel conservation programme. The airline has already been using Pratt & Whitney's EcoPower engine wash service since 2011 and the EcoFlight team has already commenced working with Monarch to develop and implement fuel savings and emissions reduction solutions. Offered in collaboration with fuel conservation programme provider Flight Sciences International and fuel efficiency software company Aviaso, EcoFlight Solutions can typically save an airline 3 to 8 per cent in fuel costs annually, claims Pratt & Whitney. Read more ...

Etihad discovers new cleaner look for its aircraft also has environmental benefits | Etihad,Permagard
Etihad discovers new cleaner look for its aircraft also has environmental benefits
Tue 24 Nov 2009 - Abu Dhabi-based Etihad Airways has found that trials of Permagard, a polymer coating applied to the exterior of its aircraft to ensure a clean look, have demonstrated significant savings in the amount of water and fluids used in cleaning the aircraft. The airline estimates a 10 million litre water savings, or 75 percent, in 2010 from reduced cleaning, as well as 96 percent reduction in cleaning fluid - from 50,000 litres to just 2,000. Anticipated fuel efficiency improvements as a result of reduced drag during flight as a result of the Permagard coating are currently being evaluated but Etihad has nevertheless committed to having its entire fleet treated with the clear coating. Read more ...

Pratt & Whitney extends its EcoPower engine wash service to the Middle East and North Africa | Pratt & Whitney,Saudi Arabian Airlines,AeroSvit,Juniper
Pratt & Whitney extends its EcoPower engine wash service to the Middle East and North Africa
Tue 24 Nov 2009 - Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has signed an agreement with Saudi Arabian Airlines that will provide for the airline to wash its own engines and those of other commercial airlines that fly within the Kingdom. Initially, two EcoPower service centres will be located in Jeddah and Riyadh, with options to expand to other locations. Pratt & Whitney claims the engine wash system can reduce fuel burn and emissions by as much as 1.2 percent and says it is more effective and much faster than traditional engine wash processes. One such traditional manufacturer is Juniper of Liverpool, UK, who is to supply AeroSvit Ukrainian Airlines with its Multi-Engine Compressor Rig. Read more ...

Airbus and IAI to develop pilot-controlled, semi-robotic aircraft tow tractor to allow engines-off taxiing | Airbus, IAI, WheelTug, tugs, tractors
Airbus and IAI to develop pilot-controlled, semi-robotic aircraft tow tractor to allow engines-off taxiing
Mon 6 July 2009 - Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) and Airbus have agreed to jointly develop and test an innovative environmentally-friendly, towbar-less tractor fitted with hardware and software that will enable pilots of both wide and narrow body aircraft to taxi to and from the gate without the use of their jet engines. An initial evaluation of the concept, called Taxibot, has shown promising results, says Airbus, and will now undergo further ground tests in Toulouse. The aircraft manufacturer says that taxiing at airports using main engines is forecast to cost airlines around $7 billion by 2012 and results in emissions of around 18 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Read more ...

Wing modification specialist confirms fuel and emissions can be reduced by up to 4 percent on older 737s | AeroTech Services
Wing modification specialist confirms fuel and emissions can be reduced by up to 4 percent on older 737s
Fri 19 Jun 2009 - Reno, Nevada-based AeroTech Services says it is seeing positive performance improvement results on the first Boeing 737-400 aircraft utilizing the company's wing modification. AeroTech says the modification reduces fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by up to 4 percent on the Boeing Classics (-200 to -500 models), which has been verified in FAA flight tests. The simple modification increases the aircraft's wing area and camber, and lengthens the wing chord, resulting in an increased lift-to-drag ratio, effectively reducing fuel burn and emissions during climb and cruise periods. Read more ...

GE and NASA to begin wind-tunnel test programme this summer to evaluate open-rotor jet engines | GE, CFM, open rotor engines, engines
GE and NASA to begin wind-tunnel test programme this summer to evaluate open-rotor jet engines
Mon 15 Jun 2009 - Following the refurbishment of a special test rig at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, engine manufacturer GE Aviation and NASA will begin wind-tunnel testing of counter-rotating fan-blade systems for open-rotor jet engine designs this summer. The open-rotor engine has been touted by both GE and rival Rolls-Royce as a possible next-generation engine for narrowbody aircraft because of its potential for substantial reductions in fuel consumption and emissions of CO2 and NOx. However, the prime challenge for them both is to arrest the significant increase in engine noise levels posed by the open design. Read more ...

Era Systems to upgrade noise and flight track monitoring system at Phoenix Sky Harbor | Phoenix Sky Harbor, Era Systems, Bruel & Kjaer, environmental management systems, Lochard, noise monitoring
Era Systems to upgrade noise and flight track monitoring system at Phoenix Sky Harbor
Tue 24 Feb 2009 - The City of Phoenix has awarded a contract to Era Systems Corporation to upgrade its noise and flight track monitoring system at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. It will feature Era's AirScene.com NOMS (Noise and Operations Management System) and Bruel & Kjaer's 3639E noise monitors. AirScene.com NOMS allows the airport to correlate aircraft identification data with flight tracks to determine specific aircraft noise levels. The system will be used in the areas surrounding the airport, one of the top ten busiest airports in the US. Read more ...

Lufthansa Cargo starts pilot scheme using lightweight containers to test fuel and emissions savings potential | Lufthansa Cargo, Jettainer, containers, technology
Lufthansa Cargo starts pilot scheme using lightweight containers to test fuel and emissions savings potential
Tue 24 Feb 2009 - Lufthansa Cargo and Jettainer have initiated a pilot scheme to test the impact of lightweight containers on the air cargo carrier's environmental performance and transport costs. The trial will provide information about their weight advantages and shed light on the behaviour of containers made of composite materials compared with their conventional aluminium counterparts. The lightweight containers are around 15 percent lighter and their use could lead to significant fuel and emissions savings. Read more ...